Canada Plastics Pact expands with new stakeholders committed to achieving a circular economy for plastics packaging

5 April 2023

Canada Plastics Pact (CPP) is pleased to welcome five new Signatory Partners in Q1 of 2023 who united under the CPP’s shared action plan to build a circular economy for plastics packaging in Canada.

The new Signatory Partners of the CPP are: Apical Reuse, Soapstand, Reusables.com, Lantic Inc., and Change Plastic For Good Inc.

CPP's growing list of Partners is taking innovative approaches to keep plastics in the economy and out of the environment. Apical has developed a reusable cannabis packaging system that cuts costs for licensed producers and manufacturers while reducing single-use waste. Soapstand's affordable refill stations promote waste-free packaging. Reusables.com is transforming the disposable culture at cafes, restaurants, and grocery stores with its cup and container sharing platform. Lantic Inc., a leading Canadian sugar and sweetener company, is dedicated to working with the plastics packaging ecosystem to minimize its environmental impact. Change Plastic For Good, a biotechnology group, is offering a viable and innovative alternative to traditional plastics, which is changing the way we think about and use plastic.

“We are pleased to welcome these innovative and forward-thinking companies as new Signatory Partners of the Canada Plastics Pact,” said Paul Shorthouse, Interim Managing Director at the CPP. “By working collaboratively across the entire value chain, addressing both upstream and downstream innovation, we can ensure that plastics are used and disposed of in a sustainable and responsible manner. We are particularly encouraged to be joined by more companies focused on upstream innovation and reuse systems, which will accelerate progress towards achieving a circular plastics packaging economy.”

The CPP, which has more than 90 Partners, is collaborating with a diverse group of stakeholders across the plastics value chain to address one of the most pressing environmental issues of today. Through this collaboration, the CPP continues to work towards ambitious targets for circular plastics packaging in Canada, set out in its Roadmap to 2025.

Since the CPP launched in January 2021, various initiatives have been underway to address the opportunities and challenges to enacting systems change, such as the formation of nine working groups that bring together the essential actors to tackle the key issues around plastic packaging waste and pollution. Most recently, the CPP is proud to announce the launch of a new working group focused on advancing reuse systems within the Canadian marketplace.

In addition, the CPP, in collaboration with PAC Global, has been leading the consultation and implementation of the Golden Design Rules for Plastics Packaging in the Canadian marketplace, which was developed by the Consumer Goods Forum's (CGF) Plastic Waste Coalition of Action.

Resources:

Read the Canada Plastics Pact Roadmap to 2025.
Read quotes from Canada Plastics Pact Partners.
Learn more about our story in this video.

Media inquiries:
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Moojan Haidari, Communications Manager
[email protected]

About the Canada Plastics Pact
The Canada Plastics Pact (CPP) is tackling plastic waste and pollution, as a multi-stakeholder, industry-led, cross-value chain collaboration platform. The CPP brings together Partners who are united behind a vision of creating a circular economy in Canada in which plastic waste is kept in the economy and out of the environment. It unites businesses, government, non-governmental organizations, and other key actors in the local plastics value chain behind clear actionable targets for 2025. The CPP is a member of the Ellen MacArthur Foundation’s Global Plastics Pact network. It operates as an independent initiative of The Natural Step Canada, a national charity with over 25 years experience advancing science, innovation, and strategic leadership aimed at fostering a strong and inclusive economy that thrives within nature’s limits.

 

Source: globenewswire.com